Earth Finds

Earth Finds

Rajiv Assures Fans, He Is Ready To Win 2020 National Rally Championship

The National Rally Championship (NRC) has ended 2019 in a contentious manner but some racers are already eying winning 2020 season.

Motorsport is an audacious, demanding and costly sport but for Rajiv Ruparelia, going by the results in his debut year, it looks like light work.

Not that he has not put in money, training and hard work, but because he tends to supersede his ambitions. Maybe he is lucky.

Speaking to NTV Uganda in an exclusive interview, the racer has set his eyes on winning bigger things especially the National Rally Championship on his first attempt, next year - 2020.

Rajiv Ruparelia might be a novice in the motor rally fraternity but he is surely one to look out for if the results in his first past appearances are to go by, NTV Uganda wrote about him.

Equipped with a strong VW Polo Proto, Rajiv Ruparelia Rally Team is flying high and in an interview with NTV Weekend Sport the son of Dr. Sudhir Ruparelia says he is up for the challenge.

“My next target is to go for the NRC championship. If I do get the NRC, my next step is to go straight to the IRC,” Rajiv told the TV crew, adding; “They have to be ready (competitors) for me because I am coming hard. I will let my performance speak,”

Asked where he gets his interest in sport, Rajiv said he has always been ‘a sportsman all my life,’ “I get that from my father, my mother played golf, badminton and other sports. But I get it all from my father who introduced me to all sorts of sport,” he said.

And having debuted in the motorsport sport in May this year, Rajiv describes the past months as ‘an exciting season overall.’ “I have thrown my results in their faces. They can take it straight if they want.” he bragged.

 

COP25: Renewable Energy Ambition In NDCs Must Double By 2030

Countries are being urged to significantly raise renewable energy ambition and adopt targets to transform the global energy system in the next round of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), according to a new report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) that will be released at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP25) in Madrid.

The report will show that renewable energy ambition within NDCs would have to more than double by 2030 to put the world in line with the Paris Agreement goals, cost-effectively reaching 7.7 terawatts (TW) of globally installed capacity by then. Today's renewable energy pledges under the NDCs are falling short of this, targeting only 3.2 TW.

The report NDCs in 2020: Advancing Renewables in the Power Sector and Beyond will be released at IRENA's official side event on enhancing NDCs and raising ambition on 11 December 2019. It will state that with over 2.3 TW installed renewable capacity today, almost half of the additional renewable energy capacity foreseen by current NDCs has already been installed. The analysis will also highlight that delivering on increased renewable energy ambition can be achieved in a cost-effective way and with considerable socio-economic benefits across the world. 

"Increasing renewable energy targets is absolutly necessary," said IRENA's Director-General Francesco La Camera. "Much more is possible. There is a decisive opportunity for policy makers to step up climate action by raising ambition on renewables, which are the only immediate solution to meet rising energy demand whilst decarbonizing the economy and building resilience".

"IRENA's analysis shows that a pathway to a decarbonised economy is technologically possible and socially and economically beneficial," continued Mr. La Camera. "Renewables are good for growth, good for job creation and deliver significant welfare benefits. With renewables, we can also expand energy access and help eradicate energy poverty in line with the UN Sustainable Development Agenda 2030. IRENA will promote knowledge exchange, strengthen partnerships and work with all stakeholders to catalyse action on the ground. We are engaging with countries and regions worldwide to facilitate renewable energy projects and raise their ambitions".

NDCs must become a driving force for an accelerated global energy transformation. The current pledges reflect neither the past decade's rapid growth nor the ongoing market trends for renewables. Through a higher renewable energy ambition, NDCs could serve to advance multiple climate and development objectives.

 

  • Published in Energy
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ADF-15 Replenishment: Donors Commit $7.6bn To Support Africa's Fragile Countries

Donors of the African Development Fund (ADF) on Thursday agreed to commit $7.6 billion to speed up growth in Africa's poorest nations and help lift millions out of poverty.

This fifteenth replenishment of the ADF (ADF-15), up 32% from the previous cycle, sends a strong signal of trust in the Fund, which is the concessional window of the African Development Bank Group.

The Fund comprises 32 contributing states and benefits 37 countries – including those experiencing higher growth rates, headed towards new emerging markets, and fragile states needing special support for basic service delivery. The Fund's resources are replenished every three years.

ADF-15 will support Africa's most vulnerable countries by tackling the root causes of fragility, strengthening resilience, and mainstreaming cross-cutting issues. These include gender, climate change, governance, private sector development, and decent job creation.

"What a great pledge we've achieved with your support... Together we've exceeded the target set for this replenishment. What a great and successful replenishment story that is, "said Akinwumi Adesina, President of the African Development Bank.

Over the past 45 years, the ADF has played an important role in the development journey of African low-income countries.

In just nine years, the ADF has made a difference and positively impacted the lives of millions by:

  • Improving access to electricity for 10.9 million people;
  • Providing agriculture infrastructure and inputs for 90 million people—including 43 million women;
  • Improving access to markets and connections between countries to 66.6 million people;
  • Contributing to the continent's regional integration agenda by rehabilitating more than 2,300 km of cross-border roads;
  • Improving access to water and sanitation for 35.8 million people.

ADF-15 covers the period 2020-2022 and will build on successes of the fourteenth replenishment by being more selective and focused.

ADF-15 will focus on two Strategic Pillars: quality and sustainable infrastructure aimed at strengthening regional integration; and human governance and institutional capacity development for increased decent job creation and inclusive growth.

In pursuing these strategic priorities, ADF-15 will pay special attention to gender equality, climate change, private sector, and good governance promotion.

In his closing remarks, Patrick Dlamini CEO of the Development Bank of Southern Africa, DBSA, who spoke on behalf of South Africa's Finance minister Tito Mboweni, said the deliberations and outcome demonstrated the confidence member countries place in the African Development Bank Group as "the cornerstone institution underpinning African development."

"There is no better vehicle than the ADF," he said. "Going forward, an ambitious programme of development lies ahead."

ADF-15 will address root causes of vulnerability by systematically applying a fragility lens in all its operations. This will be specifically targeted at regions such as the Sahel, which will see a 23% increase in resources from the ADF over the next period.

ADF-15 comes at a time of tremendous opportunities and challenges for ADF countries and the world.

During the next three years, the Fund will scale up its interventions with bold and profoundly transformative projects such as Desert to Power stretching across the Sahel region. This flagship programme, aims at transforming the Sahel into the world's largest solar production zone with up to 10,000 MW of solar generation capacity and 250 million people connected to electricity.

As part of the initiative, the Yeleen Rural Electrification Project in Burkina Faso is set to provide access to electricity to 150,000 households, while the Djermaya Project in Chad will generate 10% of Chad's power capacity. 

"You will see a new spring in our step...we will be bold and decisive. We will stretch ourselves, and we will do more with your support," Adesina said.

  • Published in Africa
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OPEC, Non OPEC Members To Focus On Energy Poverty

Global oil producers will convene Friday in Vienna, Austria for the 177th OPEC Meeting. Through the meeting, the producers are aiming to determine the management of oil production in 2020.

The African Energy Chamber urges African OPEC and non-OPEC members to commit to the Declaration of Cooperation and ensure compliance. This is of key importance as it keeps the path to dignity and prosperity for African economies open.

The meeting falls amidst the climate change debate which has put pressure the global energy industry to implement less carbon-intensive energy solutions.

Attending the 177th Meeting, the Africans see this gathering as an opportunity for OPEC members to focus on the realities of energy poverty on the African continent and provide a solution that allows Africa to still meet its objectives of improving power access and building competing economies while participating in the dialogue about addressing climate change.

“Climate change is real. At the African Energy Chamber, we do not reject its existence and impact on the environment, instead, we are determined to express the importance of Africa’s progress not being halted particularly when it is progressing towards its summit,” said NJ Ayuk, Executive Chairman of the African Energy Chamber and author of Amazon best-seller, Billions at Play: The Future of African Energy and Doing Deals.

“There must be a dialogue between businesses and governments about the future of the global energy industry, but, African business must be on the table. Accounting for 7.3 percent of global oil reserves and 7.2 percent of global gas reserves, Africa should have a voice” added Ayuk.

Last week, the African Energy Chamber launched a petition against the proposition that in the wake of the climate change debate, Africa should limit the development and exploration of its full hydrocarbon potential. This, it has done not as a means to reject the realities of climate change, but rather as a plea to be given the same opportunity as our western counterparts to develop and industrialize our countries.

In tune with the African Energy Chamber’s plea for a gradual energy transition that does not enforce a swift change from one source to another, H.E. Mohammad Sanusi Barkindo, Secretary General of OPEC said earlier this year that: “The oil industry must be part of the solution to the climate change challenge. The scale of the challenge means that no single energy source is a panacea; nor can the contribution of an entire industry or group of countries be overlooked. This is not a race to renewables alone; it’s a race to lower greenhouse gas emissions.”

  • Published in World
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